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Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod
A Feature of W.P.N.M Radio
Category: Kids & Family
Location: Philadelphia, PA.
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Bob Camardella began podcasting at Podomatic in October 2005 and at the Radio Nostalgia Network at Libsyn.com in January 2006...

by Bob Camardella
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October 21, 2016 10:00 PM PDT
Doctor's Daughter Missing (Aired April 20, 1955)
21st Precinct was one of the realistic police drama series of the early- to mid-1950's that were aired in the wake of Dragnet. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operation of a single police precinct. Actual cases were used as the basis for stories. The Precinct Captain acted as the narrator for the series.The official title of the series according to the series scripts and the CBS series promotional materials was 21st Precinct and not Twenty-First Precinct or Twenty First Precinct which appears in many Old-Time Radio books. In 1953 CBS decided to use New York City as the backdrop for their own half-hour police series and focus on the day-to-day operations of a single police precinct. Actual cases would be used as the basis for stories. It was mentioned in each episode's closing by the announcer that, "Twenty-first Precinct is presented with the official cooperation of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association an organization of more than 20,000 members of the Police Department, City of New York." Show Notes From The Digital Deli. THIS EPISODE: April 20, 1955. "Doctor's Daughter Missing" - CBS net origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. The system cue and music fill have been deleted. Announced as the last program of the current series. Everett Sloane, Stanley Niss (writer, director), Ken Lynch, Harold Stone, Lola Peyser, Jan Miner, Les Damon, Frank Campanella, George Bryan (announcer). 28:24. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 21, 2016 05:03 PM PDT
The White Willow Murder Case (Aired March 22, 1949)
Philo Vance was the detective creation of S. S. Van Dine first published in the mid 1920s. Vance, in the original books, is an intellectual so highly refined he seems he might be ghostwritten by P. G. Wodehouse. Take this quote from The Benson Murder Case, 1924, as Vance pontificates in his inimitable way: "That's your fundamental error, don't y' know. Every crime is witnessed by outsiders, just as is every work of art. The fact that no one sees the criminal, or the artist, actu'lly at work, is wholly incons'quential." Thankfully, the radio series uses only the name, and makes Philo a pretty normal, though very intelligent and extremely courteous gumshoe. Jose Ferrer played him in 1945. From 1948-1950, the fine radio actor Jackson Beck makes Vance as good as he gets. George Petrie plays Vance's constantly impressed public servant, District Attorney Markham. Joan Alexander is Ellen Deering, Vance's secretary and right-hand woman THIS EPISODE: March 22, 1949. Program #37. ZIV Syndication. "The White Willow Murder". Commercials added locally. A stockbroker is murdered while giving bad advice and romancing a gangster's girlfriend. Jackson Beck. 26:55. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 21, 2016 12:00 PM PDT
The Peerless Fire Matter (Aired May 5, 1957)
The guest stars and supporting casts were always first rate, attracting the best radio actors in both Los Angeles and New York. Pat McCracken was played by several actors – most frequently, by Larry Dobkin. Particularly noteworthy was the work of Virginia Gregg, who played many roles, including Johnny's girlfriend Betty Lewis. Harry Bartell was also a frequent guest, who did many of the Spanish dialect roles when Johnny went to a Latin American country. Other frequent guest performers were Parley Baer, Tony Barrett, John Dehner, Don Diamond, Sam Edwards, Herb Ellis, Frank Gerstle, Stacy Harris, Jack Kruschen, Forrest Lewis, Howard McNear, Marvin Miller, Jeanette Nolan, Vic Perrin, Barney Phillips, Jean Tatum, Russell Thomson, Ben Wright, and Will Wright. Vincent Price co-starred as himself in "The Price of Fame Matter" and went to Europe with Johnny on the case. In December 1960, the show moved to New York. Robert Readick started the New York run as Dollar, but only lasted a short while. Jack Johnstone continued to write for the show and submitted scripts from California. THIS EPISODE: May 5, 1957. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Peerless Fire Matter". A junkyard has burnt down in a residential area...and the neighbors are overjoyed! Bob Bailey, Forrest Lewis, Hans Conried, Herb Vigran, Parley Baer, Virginia Gregg. 32:17. Show Notes From The Old Time Radio Researcher's Group and The Digital Deli.

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October 21, 2016 07:00 AM PDT
Fibber Goes To Night School (Aired November 14, 1944)
Fibber McGee and Molly was a popular radio show during the era of classic, old-time radio. It was one of the longest-running comedies in the history of classic radio in the United States. The series premiered on NBC in 1935 and remained popular until its demise in 1959, long after radio had ceased to be the dominant form of entertainment in American popular culture. James "Jim" Jordan (16 November 1896–1 April 1988) and Marian Driscoll (15 April 1898–7 April 1961), were natives of Peoria, Illinois who met in church and married in 1918. The genesis of Fibber McGee and Molly occurred when the small-time husband-and-wife vaudevillians began their third year as Chicago-area radio performers. Two of the shows they did for station WENR beginning in 1927, both written by Harry Lawrence, bore traces of what was to come and rank as one of the earliest forms of situation comedy. THIS EPISODE: November 14, 1944. I>"Fibber Goes To Night School" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Johnson's Wax. Fibber is about to start his first class at night school. Jim Jordan, Marian Jordan, Billy Mills and His Orchestra, The King's Men, Harlow Wilcox, Don Quinn (writer), Shirley Mitchell, Marlin Hurt, Arthur Q. Bryan. 29:09. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 21, 2016 02:00 AM PDT
The Bench Warmer (Aired ecember 11, 1948)
Frank Merriwell is a fictional character appearing in a series of novels and short stories by Gilbert Patten, who wrote under the pseudonym Burt L. Standish. The character also appears in numerous radio serials and comic books based on the stories. The model for all later American juvenile sports fiction, Merriwell excelled at football, baseball, basketball, crew and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. He played with great strength and received traumatic blows without injury. A biographical entry on Patten noted dryly that Frank Merriwell "had little in common with his creator or his readers." Patten offered some background on his character: "The name was symbolic of the chief characteristics I desired my hero to have. Frank for frankness, merry for a happy disposition, well for health and abounding vitality." Merriwell's classmates observed, "He never drinks. That's how he keeps himself in such fine condition all the time. He will not smoke, either, and he takes his exercise regularly. He is really a remarkable freshie." THIS EPISODE: December 11, 1948. NBC network. "The Bench Warmer". Sustaining. The father of the basketball player that Yale needs to win "the big game" won't let him join the team. Lawson Zerbe, Hal Studer, Elaine Rost, Harlow Wilcox (announcer), Burt L. Standish (creator). 27:33. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 09:00 PM PDT
When The Mountain Fell (Aired October 26, 1956)
Beginning with CBS' Columbia Workshop from 1936 to 1947, CBS set out to experiment with Radio--to push that invisible envelope of the speed of sound, the speed of light, and to capitalize on the human listeners' comparitively narrow band of audible sound. Not so much experiment in terms of hardware technology, as in Radio's earliest efforts in 'broad casting' radio transmissions, but in concept, engineering, scoring and production technique. The most well-known and widely acclaimed proponent of these techniques was Norman Corwin. Corwin was so critically and popularly successful in experimental broadcasts that CBS gave him virtual carte blanche to produce whatever projects he deemed of possible interest--at least until the HUAC years anyway. Corwin's well-deserved acclaim aside, the various other CBS experimental programming efforts over the years very much set the bar for other networks. THIS EPISODE: October 26, 1956. CBS network. "When The Mountain Fell". Sustaining. A French drama about a shepherd, who apparently returns from the dead, two months after being buried alive by an avalanche. 29:35. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 04:02 PM PDT
The Jailbreak (Aired February 22, 1953)
NBC first envisioned The Chase as a new Television feature. This was not uncommon during the later 1940s and early 1950s. Several Radio features straddled both media, with varying success. Developed as a psychological drama, the premise was that many life situations place their subjects in a 'chase' of one type or another. A chase for fame. A chase from peril. A chase to beat the clock. A chase to escape death. The added twist was the question of who is the hunter or the hunted in these situations. The scripts were faced paced, starred quality east coast talent and were well written. The series' plots and themes focused primarily on predominantly fear inducing pursuits of one form or another. Thus most of the scripts were fraught with tension of one type or another. Whether mental tension, physical peril or a mix of both, the abiding theme throughout the series was the the contrasts between the 'hunter' and the 'hunted' in such Life situations. THIS EPISODE: February 22, 1953. NBC network. "The Jailbreak". Sustaining. A tough cop goes under cover in a prison to get the goods on Monks, a very tough convict. Lawrence Klee (creator, writer), Fred Weihe (director, transcriber), Fred Collins (announcer), Larry Haines, Ralph Bell, Ken Williams, Kermit Murdock, Bernard Lenrow. 33:42. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 10:00 AM PDT
Dangerous Resolution (Aired December 28, 1948)
The stories were well written and directed by William N. Robson as well as McGill. The skill of this group shows in making the series very good radio. The show was a big promoter of the free press and the first amendment with its opening sequence: "Freedom of the press is a flaming sword! Use it justly...hold it high...guard it well!" The second series began immediately in the 1943 season when the production moved from Hollywood to New York. Robinson left (Trevor left two years earlier as her career starting taking off) and McGill reorganized the series placing Edward Pawley in the role of Wilson opposite Fran Carlon as Lorelei. Pawley's Wilson was more mellifluous compared to the rather nasty Robinson. The series' success continued on radio until 1952 leaving only the television version (which began in 1950). THIS EPISODE: December 28, 1948. NBC network. "The Dangerous Resolution". Sponsored by: Rinso, Lifebuoy. Edward Pawley, Fran Carlon, Jerry McGill (producer, writer), Hugh James (announcer). 28:21. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 05:00 AM PDT
The Secret Melody Quiz Show (Aired October 31, 1948)
Amos 'n' Andy began as one of the first radio comedy series, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago. After the program was first broadcast in 1928, it grew and became a hugely popular radio series. Early episodes were broadcast from the El Mirador Hotel in Palm Springs, California. The show ran as a nightly radio serial from 1928 until 1943, as a weekly situation comedy from 1943 until 1955, and as a nightly disc-jockey program from 1954 until 1960. A television adaptation ran on CBS-TV from 1951 until 1953, and continued in syndicated reruns from 1954 until 1966. It would not be seen to a nationwide audience again until 2012. THIS EPISODE: October 31, 1948. CBS network. "The Secret Melody Quiz Show". Sponsored by: Rinso, Lifebouy Soap. Brother-in-law Leroy sells the answer to the "Secret Melody" radio quiz show to the Kingfish. Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, John Lake (commercial spokesman), Art Gilmore (announcer), Jeff Alexander (music). 30:14. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 12:00 AM PDT
Change Of Address (Aired January 22, 1952)
Written and directed by Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan, the series began on the Mutual Broadcasting System, December 5, 1943, continuing in many different timeslots until September 16, 1952. Unlike many other shows of the era, The Mysterious Traveler was without a sponsor for its entire run. The lonely sound of a distant locomotive heralded the arrival of the malevolent narrator, portrayed by Maurice Tarplin, who introduced himself each week in the following manner. This is the Mysterious Traveler, inviting you to join me on another journey into the strange and terrifying. I hope you will enjoy the trip, that it will thrill you a little and chill you a little. So settle back, get a good grip on your nerves and be comfortable -- if you can! THIS EPISODE: January 22, 1952. Mutual network. "Change Of Address". Sustaining. A henpecked husband buys a "house made for murder" on the shore of the Pacific Ocean. David Kogan (writer, producer, director), Maurice Tarplin (as "The Traveler"), Robert A. Arthur (writer). 26:30. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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