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Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod
A Feature of W.P.N.M Radio
Category: Kids & Family
Location: Philadelphia, PA.
Followers (315)
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Bob Camardella began podcasting at Podomatic in October 2005 and at the Radio Nostalgia Network at Libsyn.com in January 2006...

by Bob Camardella
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October 20, 2016 09:00 PM PDT
When The Mountain Fell (Aired October 26, 1956)
Beginning with CBS' Columbia Workshop from 1936 to 1947, CBS set out to experiment with Radio--to push that invisible envelope of the speed of sound, the speed of light, and to capitalize on the human listeners' comparitively narrow band of audible sound. Not so much experiment in terms of hardware technology, as in Radio's earliest efforts in 'broad casting' radio transmissions, but in concept, engineering, scoring and production technique. The most well-known and widely acclaimed proponent of these techniques was Norman Corwin. Corwin was so critically and popularly successful in experimental broadcasts that CBS gave him virtual carte blanche to produce whatever projects he deemed of possible interest--at least until the HUAC years anyway. Corwin's well-deserved acclaim aside, the various other CBS experimental programming efforts over the years very much set the bar for other networks. THIS EPISODE: October 26, 1956. CBS network. "When The Mountain Fell". Sustaining. A French drama about a shepherd, who apparently returns from the dead, two months after being buried alive by an avalanche. 29:35. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 04:02 PM PDT
The Jailbreak (Aired February 22, 1953)
NBC first envisioned The Chase as a new Television feature. This was not uncommon during the later 1940s and early 1950s. Several Radio features straddled both media, with varying success. Developed as a psychological drama, the premise was that many life situations place their subjects in a 'chase' of one type or another. A chase for fame. A chase from peril. A chase to beat the clock. A chase to escape death. The added twist was the question of who is the hunter or the hunted in these situations. The scripts were faced paced, starred quality east coast talent and were well written. The series' plots and themes focused primarily on predominantly fear inducing pursuits of one form or another. Thus most of the scripts were fraught with tension of one type or another. Whether mental tension, physical peril or a mix of both, the abiding theme throughout the series was the the contrasts between the 'hunter' and the 'hunted' in such Life situations. THIS EPISODE: February 22, 1953. NBC network. "The Jailbreak". Sustaining. A tough cop goes under cover in a prison to get the goods on Monks, a very tough convict. Lawrence Klee (creator, writer), Fred Weihe (director, transcriber), Fred Collins (announcer), Larry Haines, Ralph Bell, Ken Williams, Kermit Murdock, Bernard Lenrow. 33:42. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 10:00 AM PDT
Dangerous Resolution (Aired December 28, 1948)
The stories were well written and directed by William N. Robson as well as McGill. The skill of this group shows in making the series very good radio. The show was a big promoter of the free press and the first amendment with its opening sequence: "Freedom of the press is a flaming sword! Use it justly...hold it high...guard it well!" The second series began immediately in the 1943 season when the production moved from Hollywood to New York. Robinson left (Trevor left two years earlier as her career starting taking off) and McGill reorganized the series placing Edward Pawley in the role of Wilson opposite Fran Carlon as Lorelei. Pawley's Wilson was more mellifluous compared to the rather nasty Robinson. The series' success continued on radio until 1952 leaving only the television version (which began in 1950). THIS EPISODE: December 28, 1948. NBC network. "The Dangerous Resolution". Sponsored by: Rinso, Lifebuoy. Edward Pawley, Fran Carlon, Jerry McGill (producer, writer), Hugh James (announcer). 28:21. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 05:00 AM PDT
The Secret Melody Quiz Show (Aired October 31, 1948)
Amos 'n' Andy began as one of the first radio comedy series, written and voiced by Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll and originating from station WMAQ in Chicago. After the program was first broadcast in 1928, it grew and became a hugely popular radio series. Early episodes were broadcast from the El Mirador Hotel in Palm Springs, California. The show ran as a nightly radio serial from 1928 until 1943, as a weekly situation comedy from 1943 until 1955, and as a nightly disc-jockey program from 1954 until 1960. A television adaptation ran on CBS-TV from 1951 until 1953, and continued in syndicated reruns from 1954 until 1966. It would not be seen to a nationwide audience again until 2012. THIS EPISODE: October 31, 1948. CBS network. "The Secret Melody Quiz Show". Sponsored by: Rinso, Lifebouy Soap. Brother-in-law Leroy sells the answer to the "Secret Melody" radio quiz show to the Kingfish. Freeman Gosden, Charles Correll, John Lake (commercial spokesman), Art Gilmore (announcer), Jeff Alexander (music). 30:14. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 20, 2016 12:00 AM PDT
Change Of Address (Aired January 22, 1952)
Written and directed by Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan, the series began on the Mutual Broadcasting System, December 5, 1943, continuing in many different timeslots until September 16, 1952. Unlike many other shows of the era, The Mysterious Traveler was without a sponsor for its entire run. The lonely sound of a distant locomotive heralded the arrival of the malevolent narrator, portrayed by Maurice Tarplin, who introduced himself each week in the following manner. This is the Mysterious Traveler, inviting you to join me on another journey into the strange and terrifying. I hope you will enjoy the trip, that it will thrill you a little and chill you a little. So settle back, get a good grip on your nerves and be comfortable -- if you can! THIS EPISODE: January 22, 1952. Mutual network. "Change Of Address". Sustaining. A henpecked husband buys a "house made for murder" on the shore of the Pacific Ocean. David Kogan (writer, producer, director), Maurice Tarplin (as "The Traveler"), Robert A. Arthur (writer). 26:30. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 19, 2016 07:00 PM PDT
Murder Must Be Paid For (Aired August 5, 1945)
With The Sealed Book, each epsisode opened with the sound of the great gong, followed by Philip Clarke's observation that the Keeper of The Book had once again opened the door to the secret vault, within which was contained the 'great sealed book' recording 'all the secrets and mysteries of mankind through the ages.' At the end of all but the last episode, Clarke would tell listeners to tune in the following week when "the sound of the great gong heralds another strange and exciting tale from... the sealed book." Keep in mind that even though the 26 scripts of The Sealed Book were derived from The Mysterious Traveler, it's instructive to note that each production used a different cast than that of it's associated production from The Mysterious Traveler. And indeed, some of the production values were a cut above in The Sealed Book, as contrasted with their similar productions from The Mysterious Traveler. Show Notes From The Old Time Radio Researcher's Group. THIS EPISODE: August 5, 1945. Program #21. Mutual network origination, Michelson syndication. "Murder Must Be Paid For". Commercials added locally. A man kills his wife, but she returns to haunt him, in another form! This program has also been dated Aoctober 7, 1945 on WGN, Chicago. Robert A. Arthur (writer), David Kogan (writer), Phillip Clarke (host), Jock MacGregor (producer, director). 30:12. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 19, 2016 02:00 PM PDT
The Twisting Weeds of Death (Aired May 25, 1953)
It began at KALL in Salt Lake City in 1946 and lasted a year. Richard Thorne and Carl Greyson were announcers who created a bare bones murder mystery drama with stories written or adapted by Robert Olson. But when Thorne and Greyson went separate ways, the series discontinued. Then in 1949, Thorne and Greyson happened to work at the same station again (WGN in Chicago) and the series resumed. This time, the focus was on supernatural horror with Richard Thorne writing or adapting the stories. The three dozen or so shows that survived appear to have been recorded for broadcast transcriptions. (A recorded scene from the climax is played at the beginning of the program as a teaser.) Richard Thorne is one of the main recurring actors. Hall of Fantasy didn't seem to have much of a budget. The actors weren't big names and the music and sound effects were sometimes lackluster. But the situations and original writing often made up for these shortcomings. It was similar in that way to another low budget but even more imaginative series, Quiet Please. THIS EPISODE: May 25, 1953. Mutual network, WGN, Chicago origination. "The Twisting Weeds Of Death". Commercials deleted. A soggy lady with hair made of seaweed returns from the dead on the twenty-fifth anniversary of her death. Maurice Copeland, Richard Thorne (writer). 24:52. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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October 19, 2016 09:16 AM PDT
The Case Of The Costumed Killer (Aired May 24, 1947)
The series dramatized FBI cases, which producer-director Phillips H. Lord arranged in close association with Bureau director J. Edgar Hoover. Hoover insisted that only closed cases would be used. The initial series was on NBC Radio from July 20 - October 12, 1935. It then aired on CBS from January 15, 1936 to June 15, 1940, sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive and Cue magazine. From October 11, 1940 to December 25, 1948, it was heard on the Blue Network, with various sponsors that included Sloan's Liniment, Waterman pens and Tide. Returning to CBS on January 8, 1949, it ran until June 25, 1955, sponsored by Grape-Nuts and Wrigley's chewing gum. The final series was on the Mutual Broadcasting System from October 5, 1955 to November 27, 1957. THIS EPISODE: May 24, 1947. Program #487. "The Case Of The Costumed Killer" aka: "The Case Of The Crime Teacher" - ABC network origination, syndicated, WRVR-FM, New York rebroadcast. Sponsored by: Arrow Audio. William Usery committed murder several times. He also taught young boys how to succeed in a life of crime. Don Gardiner (announcer). 22:31. Show Notes Ready To Post

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October 19, 2016 03:00 AM PDT
The Magnificent Dope (Aired March 11, 1945)
The Old Gold Comedy Theater was an NBC series that aired for the single 1944-1945 season, Sundays 10:30 - 11:00 pm. It was hosted by comedy star Harold Lloyd, of silent film fame, and featuring some of the biggest names from film and radio. In October 1944, Lloyd emerged as the director and host of The Old Gold Comedy Theater, an NBC radio anthology series, The show presented half-hour radio adaptations of recently successful film comedies, beginning with Palm Beach Story with Claudette Colbert and Robert Young. Some saw The Old Gold Comedy Theater as being a lighter version of Lux Radio Theater, and it featured some of the best-known film and radio personalities of the day, including Fred Allen, June Allyson, Lucille Ball, Ralph Bellamy, Linda Darnell, Susan Hayward, Herbert Marshall, Dick Powell, Edward G. Robinson, Jane Wyman, and Alan Young, among others. But the show's half-hour format — which meant the material might have been truncated too severely — and Lloyd's sounding somewhat ill at ease on the air for much of the season (though he spent weeks training himself to speak on radio prior to the show's premiere, and seemed more relaxed toward the end of the series run) may have worked against it.

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October 18, 2016 10:00 PM PDT
D Day (Aired June 7, 1950)
The Colmans had shown a flair for radio comedy in recurring roles on The Jack Benny Program in the late 1940s, and they landed the title roles in the new show. The Halls of Ivy featured Colman as William Todhunter Hall, the president of small, Midwestern Ivy College, and his wife, Victoria, a former British musical comedy star who sometimes felt the tug of her former profession, and followed their interactions with students, friends and college trustees. Others in the cast included Herbert Butterfield as testy Clarence Wellman, Willard Waterman (then starring as Harold Peary's successor as The Great Gildersleeve) as John Merriweather, and Elizabeth Patterson and Gloria Gordon as the Halls' maid. THIS EPISODE: June 7, 1950. "D Day" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Schlitz Beer. Phillip Weatherby wants to be a farmer, and is being expelled from the school of law, despite his father's desire for him to be a lawyer. Benita Hume, Bill Thompson, Cameron Blake (writer), Conrad Binyon, Don Quinn (creator, writer), Henry Russell (composer, conductor), Ken Carpenter (announcer), Nat Wolff (director), Ronald Colman. 29:21. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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