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Boxcars711 Old Time Radio Pod
A Feature of W.P.N.M Radio
Category: Kids & Family
Location: Philadelphia, PA.
Followers (272)
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Bob Camardella began podcasting at Podomatic in October 2005 and at the Radio Nostalgia Network at Libsyn.com in January 2006...


by Bob Camardella
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February 09, 2016 01:01 PM PST
The First Aid Course (Aired June 3, 1951)
Our Miss Brooks, an American situation comedy, began as a radio hit in 1948 and migrated to television in 1952, becoming one of the earlier hits of the so-called Golden Age of Television, and making a star out of Eve Arden (1908-1990) as comely, wisecracking, but humane high school English teacher Connie Brooks. The show hooked around Connie's daily relationships with Madison High School students, colleagues, and pompous principal Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), not to mention favourite student Walter Denton (future television and Rambo co-star Richard Crenna, who fashioned a higher-pitched voice to play the role) and biology teacher Philip Boynton ( Jeff Chandler), the latter Connie's all-but-unrequited love interest, who saw science everywhere and little else anywhere. THIS EPISODE: June 3, 1951. "The First Aid Course" - CBS network origination, AFRS rebroadcast. Miss Brooks has to take over teaching Madison High's first aid course. But first, a test of her abilities. The system cue has been deleted. Eve Arden, Al Lewis (writer, director), Jane Morgan, Gloria McMillan, Gale Gordon, Jeff Chandler, Richard Crenna, Larry Berns (producer), Mary Jane Croft, Wilbur Hatch (music). 30:50. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 09, 2016 05:00 AM PST
Boxcars711 Overnight Western "Fort Laramie" - The Loving Cup (Aired June 24, 1956)
By the mid-1950s when Fort Laramie began, most of the actors on the west coast were doing some television and movie work so the program was rehearsed and taped for transcription during the evening. Once a week the cast and crew gathered at CBS Studio One in Hollywood to tape the show. In 1956 this was the last radio production studio in use in California. The series debuted on January 22, 1956 with an episode entitled "Playing Indian." Fort Laramie aired forty one episodes from January 22, 1956 to October 28, 1956. An audition episode was recorded on July 25, 1955. THIS EPISODE: June 24, 1956. CBS network origination, AFRTS rebroadcast. "The Loving Cup". Captain Quince has an unusual way to give Lieutenant Seiberts the confidence he needs to be a good officer. The program was recorded May 31, 1956. Raymond Burr, Kathleen Hite (writer), Helen Kleeb. 30:32. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 09, 2016 01:00 AM PST
Five Ounces Of Treason (Aired January 13, 1951)
The 1944 CBS Summer season finale, Murder, Music and A Blonde Madonna, gives some credence to the way CBS promoted this first run. Starring Herbert Marshall as Ken Thurston, a private operative, with Han Conried as Egon Zellschmidt in this first incarnation of Ken Thurston's nemesis, and Mary Jane Croft appearing in the role of Ken's love interest, Nancy Bessington, a reporter and Thurston's erstwhile fiance. We can only interpolate from what we've already turned up for this shortest run of The Man Called X, but it would appear that Hans Conried and Mary Jane Croft may have been regulars co-stars throughout that first season. One of Radio's most successful directors, William N. Robson, directed the first season of The Man Called X and though Gordon Jenkins appears to be credited with the music for the first season, Felix Mills is also personally cited by Herbert Marshall with at least one Music Direction credit--the season finale. Show Notes From The Digital Deli. THIS EPISODE: January 13, 1951. "Five Ounces Of Treason" - NBC network. Sponsored by: Anacin, RCA Victor. Ken Thurston flies to Cuba to track down "a tiny package that threatens the welfare of the world." Herbert Marshall, Leon Belasco, J. Richard Kennedy (producer), Felix Mills (composer, conductor), Les Crutchfield (writer), Jack Latham (announcer). 28:51. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 08, 2016 08:00 PM PST
Death In Fancy Dress (Aired December 27, 1948)
Let George Do It was a radio drama series produced by Owen and Pauline Vinson from 1946 to 1954. It starred Bob Bailey as detective-for-hire George Valentine (with Olan Soule stepping into the role in 1954). Clients came to Valentine's office after reading a newspaper carrying his classified ad: "Personal notice: Danger's my stock in trade. If the job's too tough for you to handle, you've got a job for me. George Valentine. "The few earliest episodes were more sitcom than private eye shows, with a studio audience providing scattered laughter at the not-so-funny scripts. Soon the audience was banished, and George went from stumbling comedic hero to tough guy private eye, while the music became suspenseful. Valentine's secretary was Claire Brooks, aka Brooksie (Frances Robinson, Virginia Gregg, Lillian Buyeff). THIS EPISODE: December 27, 1948. Mutual-Don Lee network. "Death In Fancy Dress". Sponsored by: Standard Oil, Chevron. A blackmailer is possibly responsible for murder too. Bob Bailey, Frances Robinson, Wally Maher, Jay Novello, Gloria Blondell, Ken Christy, Luis Van Rooten, Bud Hiestand (announcer), Don Clark (director), Eddie Dunstedter (composer, conductor), David Victor (writer), Herbert Little Jr. (writer). 29:54. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 08, 2016 02:58 PM PST
Mistaken Countess (Aired February 2, 1944)
Mr. and Mrs. North was a radio mystery series that aired on CBS from 1942 to 1954. Alice Frost and Joseph Curtin had the title roles when the series began in 1942. Publisher Jerry North and his wife Pam lived in Greenwich Village at 24 St. Anne's Flat. They were not professional detectives but simply an ordinary couple who stumbled across a murder or two every week for 12 years. The radio program eventually reached nearly 20 million listeners. The characters originated in 1930s vignettes written by Richard Lockridge for the New York Sun, and he brought them back for short stories in The New Yorker. These stories were collected in Mr. and Mrs. North (1936). Lockridge increased the readership after he teamed with his wife Frances on a novel, The Norths Meet Murder (1940), launching a series of 40 novels, including Death takes a Bow, Death on the Aisle and The Dishonest Murderer. Their long-run series continued for over two decades and came to an end in 1963 with the death of Frances Lockridge. Albert Hackett and Peggy Conklin had the title roles in the Broadway production Mr. and Mrs. North, which ran 163 performances at the Belasco Theatre from January 12, 1941, to May 31, 1941. Alfred De Liagre, Jr. produced and directed the play written by Owen Davis.

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February 08, 2016 10:00 AM PST
The Missing Newshawk Caper (Aired July 18, 1948)
The Adventures of Sam Spade was a radio series based loosely on the private detective character Sam Spade, created by writer Dashiell Hammett for The Maltese Falcon. The show ran for 13 episodes on ABC in 1946, for 157 episodes on CBS in 1946-1949, and finally for 51 episodes on NBC in 1949-1951. The series starred Howard Duff (and later, Steve Dunne) as Sam Spade and Lurene Tuttle as his secretary Effie, and took a considerably more tongue-in-cheek approach to the character than the novel or movie. The series was largely overseen by producer/director William Spier. In 1947, scriptwriters Jason James and Bob Tallman received an Edgar Award for Best Radio Drama from the Mystery Writers of America. THIS EPISODE: July 18, 1948. CBS network. "The Missing Newshawk Caper". Sponsored by: Wildroot Cream-Oil. Spade is hired to find a reporter named Ray McCully. Spade finds him all right, stabbed to death! Howard Duff, Lurene Tuttle, Dashiell Hammett (creator), William Conrad, Sara Berner, Bea Benaderet (possibly), Alan Reed, Gil Doud (writer, director), Robert Tallman (writer), Lud Gluskin (music), Dick Joy (announcer). 29:57. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 08, 2016 05:00 AM PST
Boxcars711 Overnight Western "The Roy Rogers Show" - Hideaway (Aired February 22, 1952)
Roy Rogers was born to Andrew ("Andy") and Mattie (Womack) Slye in Cincinnati, Ohio, where his family lived in a tenement building on 2nd Street. (Riverfront Stadium was constructed at this location in 1970 and Rogers would later joke that he had been born at second base.) Dissatisfied with his job and city life, Andy Slye and his brother Will built a 12-by-50-foot houseboat from salvage lumber, and, in July 1912, the Slye family floated on the Ohio River towards Portsmouth, Ohio. Desiring a more stable existence in Portsmouth, the Slyes purchased land on which to build a home, but the flood of 1913 allowed them to move the houseboat to their property and continue living in it on dry land. THIS EPISODE: February 22, 1952. NBC network. Sponsored by: Post Cereals. Jake Gullick is within his rights when he refuses to allow a doctor to cross his land to treat a young girl with polio in the small town of "Hideaway." Roy yodels and sings, "The Trail To San Antone." Art Ballinger (announcer), Art Rush (producer), Robert Griffin, Charles Seel, Dale Evans, Forrest Lewis, Frank Hemingway, Herb Butterfield, Milton Charles, Pat McGeehan, Ray Wilson (writer), Roy Rogers, The Whippoorwills, Tom Hargis (director). 31:04. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.
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February 08, 2016 01:00 AM PST
Bad Medicine (Aired uly 10, 1956)
X Minus One was a half-hour science fiction radio series broadcast from April 24, 1955 to January 9, 1958 in various timeslots on NBC. Initially a revival of NBC's Dimension X (1950-51), X Minus One is widely considered among the finest science fiction dramas ever produced for radio. The first 15 episodes were new versions of Dimension X episodes, but the remainder were adaptations of newly published science fiction stories by leading writers in the field, including Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, Robert A. Heinlein, Frederik Pohl and Theodore Sturgeon, along with a few original scripts. The series was cancelled after the 126th broadcast on January 9, 1958. THIS EPISODE: July 10, 1956. NBC network. "Bad Medicine". Sustaining. Elwood would love to kill his "friend" Magnuson. Seeking help from a home therapy unit, he's unfortunately given a Martian model which has an entirely different set of parameters. The system cue has been deleted. Allan Mason, Charles Webster, Cliff Carpenter, Joseph Sullivan, Karl Weber (narrator), Norman Rose, Finn O'Donovan (author, Robert Scheckley), William Griffis, George Lefferts (adaptor), William Welch (producer), Bob Mauer (director), Fred Collins (announcer), Bill Britton, Joseph Julian, Steve Allen (American Cancer Society fund appeal). 28:55. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 07, 2016 08:00 PM PST
Practically Foolproof (Aired September 3, 1944)
The Whistler was one of radio's most popular mystery dramas, with a 13-year run from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955. If it now seems to have been influenced explicitly by The Shadow, The Whistler was no less popular or credible with its listeners, the writing was first class for its genre, and it added a slightly macabre element of humor that sometimes went missing in The Shadow's longer-lived crime stories. Writer-producer J. Donald Wilson established the tone of the show during its first two years, and he was followed in 1944 by producer-director George Allen. Other directors included Sterling Tracy and Sherman Marks with final scripts by Joel Malone and Harold Swanton. A total of 692 episodes were produced, yet despite the series' fame, over 200 episodes are lost today. In 1946, a local Chicago version of The Whistler with local actors aired Sundays on WBBM, sponsored by Meister Brau beer. THIS EPISODE: September 3, 1944. CBS Pacific network. "Practically Foolproof". Sponsored by: Signal Oil. An interesting story about two robbers who are running a lending library. Things get weird when they plan to use a dwarf to commit a robbery against his will! George W. Allen (producer, director), Harriet Reig (writer), Wilbur Hatch (composer, conductor), Bill Pennell (announcer), Jane Morgan. 29:30. Episode Notes From The Radio Gold Index.

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February 07, 2016 04:00 PM PST
The Judge Thorman Revenge Shooting (Aired October 14, 1947)
The feel of Michael Shayne over the years was arguably most noticeably evolved over Radio. Wally Maher's portrayal of Michael Shayne was not only the first over Radio, the longest running over Radio, but it was also the most fully developed over Radio. Aided by Cathy Lewis in her role of feisty bright Phyllis Knight, as well as by Joe Forte as Lieutenant Farraday, the family nature of the growing radio ensemble over the years put far more flesh on the bones of Brett Halliday's character than any other characterization that succeeded it. Maher's characterization of Shayne was so successful that for the remainder of Maher's career he actively translated Shayne's basic attributes into virtually every other detective or crime drama genre Maher appeared in until his untimely death in 1951. Were it not for Maher's premature demise, one can well imagine Wally Maher having evolved into one of the greatest, most durable character actors of all time, much in the vein of Ken Christy for example. As with many West Coast ensemble productions of the era, Michael Shayne: Private Detective soon evolved into a very secure set of well-explored character arcs, among which Cathy Lewis' character, Phyllis Knight, found herself more and more integrated into the scripts. Joe Forte's Lieutenant Farraday continued to grow into the role as well. Show Notes From The Digital Deli.

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